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October 9, 2017

FDA to Manufacturer: If You Make a Product with Love, Don’t Advertise It

Filed under: Business,Food/Groceries,Health,Humor,Retail — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:07 am

Some federal agencies have been subjected to criticism lately that they are not policing the marketplace as much as they did in the past to protect consumers. For example, Bloomberg reported two weeks ago that the Food and Drug Administration was sending 30 percent fewer warning letters to companies about serious health and safety violations than they did every year since 2008.

Now comes news that in September, the FDA sent a warning letter to Nashoba Brook Bakery in Massachusetts alleging serious violations discovered when it spent three days inspecting their manufacturing facility.

FDA warning letter

Besides citing instances of unsanitary conditions that inspectors discovered, it noted a serious labeling violation on packages of Nashoba Granola.

Nashoba granola

*MOUSE PRINT:

Love ingredient

Love ingredient

Yes, dear friends, Nashoba Brook Bakery was charged with selling misbranded products because they creatively made their granola with “love” and included that on the label.

John Gates, the CEO of the bakery, explained to Mouse Print* that while they will remedy the sanitary deficiencies cited by the FDA, “we will continue to put care, attention, passion and LOVE at the center of what we do. That’s who we are and who we want to be.”

We say the FDA should concentrate on real health and safety violations like the other findings in their letter. But, have a little heart (and common sense) when it comes to unofficial ingredients like love.

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10 Comments »

  1. Yes, it is easy to say that the FDA should focus on health and safety issues, but it appears that they did. Likewise, if facts – such as tangible ingredients – are to be upheld, then they need to be upheld, regardless of added ‘touchy-feely’ additions. Let them add that word in a slogan under the product name. Unsanitary conditions could probably define some kinds of ‘love’ as well.

    Comment by Marty — October 9, 2017 @ 7:57 am
  2. Ingredients are listed in order of quantity in the product. There must not be too much love in this product if its the last listed. As Marty mentioned, put the ‘love’ in as part of a slogan.

    Comment by bobl — October 9, 2017 @ 9:10 am
  3. To allow Nashoba bakery to include “love” in its list of ingredients would, to be sure, turn into a slippery slope that would be exploited by companies. I agree with Marty, who said Nashoba could use “love” as part of a slogan. Purina Dog Chow did it with their great slogan, “All you add is love.”

    Comment by hmc — October 9, 2017 @ 9:23 am
  4. I actually remember Goldfish crackers stating they are made with “smiles”, which comes off as much more creepy in my opinion. However,I believe it was bolded and had quotes around it. Maybe that makes it okay?

    Comment by Alex L — October 9, 2017 @ 10:01 am
  5. The FDA seems to have done a proper job with inspecting, even with their request that “love” be removed from the ingredient listing.

    I think the problems with FDA are always with ENFORCING. They can inspect all they want, but it won’t mean much if companies are not afraid of being reprimanded.

    Comment by Wayne — October 9, 2017 @ 10:55 am
  6. I want to agree with bobl here… Love should not be the last ingredient on the list.

    Should be on the front of the package instead in large letters.

    Comment by Richard — October 9, 2017 @ 11:50 am
  7. It’s odd. The law they site only lists what must appear in an ingredients list, not what can appear. Even if we look at “intervening material”, “Love” is the last ingredient on the list. It does not intervene between ingredients.

    Comment by BZ — October 9, 2017 @ 1:33 pm
  8. Your tax dollars at work. SMH

    Comment by PCnotPC — October 9, 2017 @ 5:19 pm
  9. I think Love should be listed elsewhere on the packaging. What perturbs me is the sometimes weird listings. For instance “yeast extract” in annie’s cheddar bunnies which I was told was MSG. After eating a bunch my friend’s 2 year old needed the epi pen.

    Comment by Nancy Sing — October 10, 2017 @ 7:07 am
  10. Nancy Sing,

    ‘Yeast extracts’ ARE NOT MSG! Please see the articles at these links.

    https://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/yeast-extract/

    http://www.yeastextract.info/public/documents/brochures/0281404001_yeast_extract_a5-engl.pdf

    Comment by Gert — October 10, 2017 @ 2:18 pm

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