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March 28, 2016

“Use Only in the Case of an Apocalypse”

Filed under: Business,Computers,Humor,Internet — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:46 am

Just in time for April Fool’s Day…

Amazon recently released a software gaming platform for developers called Lumberyard. Buried in its terms and conditions is this unexpected little ditty:


57.10 Acceptable Use; Safety-Critical Systems. Your use of the Lumberyard Materials must comply with the AWS Acceptable Use Policy. The Lumberyard Materials are not intended for use with life-critical or safety-critical systems, such as use in operation of medical equipment, automated transportation systems, autonomous vehicles, aircraft or air traffic control, nuclear facilities, manned spacecraft, or military use in connection with live combat. However, this restriction will not apply in the event of the occurrence (certified by the United States Centers for Disease Control or successor body) of a widespread viral infection transmitted via bites or contact with bodily fluids that causes human corpses to reanimate and seek to consume living human flesh, blood, brain or nerve tissue and is likely to result in the fall of organized civilization. [emphasis added]

So only if science fiction zombies come to life, then and only then, can this software be used to save lives.

The world can rest easy now. Thanks, Amazon.


• • •

November 30, 2015

Thanks for Nothing #1

Filed under: Electronics,Humor,Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:32 am

We are starting a new recurring feature today called “Thanks for Nothing.” It is designed to highlight offers that seem great on their face, but when you get down to the details, you’ll probably say forget it.

Example 1:

For Black Friday, Lowe’s advertised 60-watt LED bulbs for an amazing 99 cents each — the lowest price ever.

99 cent LEDs


2000 hours

These bulbs only have an expected life of 2000 hours. That is about one-tenth the time the average LED bulb is expected to last. (See our prior story about LED bulb longevity.)

Thanks for nothing, Lowe’s.

Example 2:

Also during Black Friday weekend, online stores had some amazing deals. One that crossed our screen was this leather chukka boot for only $30 — quite a bargain at that price:

Vegan Leather


Upon closer examination, it says “vegan leather.” Huh? Is that like gluten-free leather? Who knows… so we asked the company whether this was man-made, and if so why they didn’t say so. They responded:

“It is man-made however, that is vegan friendly which is why they put vegan leather/suede.” — Street Moda, customer service

So if your dog is on a vegan diet and decides to chew on your chukka boots, he won’t be going off his diet, I guess.

And to the extent that this company is trying to mislead consumers into thinking that this is a form of real leather, thanks for nothing, Street Moda.

Example 3:

Also just ahead of Black Friday, Big Lots sent out an email with a seemingly very valuable coupon — “$10 off everything” it proclaimed in the subject. Since both Kohl’s and J.C. Penney offered similar $10 off coupons on anything, this seemed very plausible.

10 off everything


$10 off $50 purchase

Oh, did you forget to list the minimum purchase requirement in the subject, Big Lots?

Thanks for (almost) nothing.

We welcome your submissions of other great “thanks for nothing” examples. Just email them to edgar(at symbol) .


• • •

August 31, 2015 Rewards Readers of Fine Print

Filed under: Humor,Internet,Sweepstakes — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:19 am

  In a twist, an Internet company is rewarding TV viewers who take the time to read the fine print in one of its commercials.

Last month, decided it has high time that TV viewers stopped fast forwarding their DVRs through their commercials. So it created a sweepstakes that required people to pause the recorded program so they could read the rules of the contest including how to enter.


The commercial only ran for a week. During that time, how many people do you think paused the commercial and actually entered the sweepstakes for a free trip?



• • •

July 20, 2015

Disney’s Frozen Had a Hidden Disclaimer

Filed under: Humor — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:11 am

  This week, a little cool summer humor…

The Disney movie, Frozen, has been a runaway success. And despite many parents watching it multiple times with their kids, they probably missed the unusual fine print buried in the credits.

During the movie, Kristoff, the male lead, declares that “all men eat their own boogers.”

Disney, for whatever reason, posted a disclaimer about this at the end of the movie.


Disney disclaimer

Now it’s your turn to add a chuckle: add your own clever explanation in the comments of why Disney included this disclaimer, other than the obvious one — that it was a joke.


• • •

March 2, 2015

Nissan Cars Can’t Snowboard…Duh

Filed under: Autos,Humor — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:17 am

  Car manufacturers love to put important details about their vehicles and offers in minuscule fine print in their television commercials. And Nissan is no exception.

Just in case you couldn’t read the tiny disclaimer in two recent Nissan commercials, we’ve captured it for you.

Commercial #1: Nissan Sentra

This ad shows Nissan cars gliding effortlessly over banks of snow the way a snowboarder would.


Nissan snowboarding

And just in case you can’t read that, and to prevent a misimpression, Nissan has an important warning for viewers. You should not try snowboarding in your car because “cars can’t snowboard.”

Commercial #2: Nissan Leaf

This ad shows Nissan cars rolling backwards out of a trailer truck while going full speed on a highway.


Nissan Leaf

So, just in case you thought you could buy a Nissan Leaf, put it on a truck, and roll backwards out of it at 60 miles an hour, the company advises viewers not to try it because you are watching a “fantasy.”

Commercial #3: Mazda

Not to be outdone, in the opening scene of a Mazda commercial about safety, they show a man who has been set on fire and provide the standard fine print warning: do not attempt.


Mazda do not attempt


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