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May 11, 2020

Bored at Home? Reading “Terms of Service” Agreements Will Fill Your Days!

Filed under: Business,Humor,Internet — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:53 am

Most of us usually don’t have the time or patience to read a website’s “terms of service” (TOS) agreement. We simply click “agree” if we are even asked in the first place to consent to their various conditions. But now that we are all cooped up at home, we actually have the time to review those contracts. I know, you’d rather clean your kitchen counter one more time and wipe down all your groceries instead.

Some of those policies are ridiculously long. The Microsoft TOS agreement, for example, runs over 15,000 words — just slightly shorter than Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

So, to help you visualize what a daunting task it would actually be to read the TOS agreements from 14 of America’s leading companies and websites, the Visual Capitalist created this infographic. It depicts the comparative length of each company’s policy and how long each would take to read.

*MOUSE PRINT:

Terms of Service

Scroll down the chart OR Click to enlarge.

These companies rely on the laziness of their customers who rarely take time to read the fine print of what they are agreeing to. And most times, the terms benefit the company more than you.




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January 20, 2020

Thanks for Nothing: CVS, Aldi, and Kmart

Filed under: Humor,Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:52 am

We once again look at various advertised offers that seemingly promise a good deal… at least until you do a little more investigation.

Example 1:

Last month on December 8, CVS advertised “lowest prices of the season” on 500 count bottles of CVS ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and apirin — bottles were only $9.79.

CVS lowest prices of the season

There’s just one problem. Two weeks earlier, Consumer World’s “bargain of the week” featured a sale on some of the same CVS pills when they were only $5.

*MOUSE PRINT:

$5 CVS Ibu

Thanks for nothing, CVS.


Example 2:

Plant-based burgers are all the rage now with the two leading brands, Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger, finding their way into chain restaurants and the meat counter at your favorite store. When MrConsumer saw that super discounter Aldi was now carrying Beyond Burger he got excited expecting to finally find them on sale at an affordable price.

Beyond Burger at Aldi

*MOUSE PRINT:

Here they claim that their price for Beyond Burger is “budget-approved.” But a closer inspection of the ad reveals that for $4.49 you only get two burgers with the package weighing a total of only eight ounces. Even organic beef is cheaper — $4.49 for a full pound (in this large package).

Thanks for nothing, Aldi.


Example 3:

At one of the Kmart stores that was not going out of business at the time, they were having a clearance sale on some items.

Kmart clearance

Wow, what a deal. Thanks for nothing, Kmart.




• • •

December 23, 2019

Consumer Humor: TV Station Tricks Interviewees with Unexpected Fine Print

Filed under: Humor — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:09 am

Note: The next new Mouse Print* story will be published on January 6th.

To teach people why they really need to read the fine print of contracts before signing, the local NBC station station in Green Bay, Wisconsin decided to pull a prank on shoppers at a local food court. Before interviewing each passerby, the reporter handed the person what was purported to be a standard release form to sign. This release, however, was peppered with absurd requirements.

Did anyone read it before signing? You can guess the answer.

So, as you are deciding on your new year’s resolutions, consider making reading the fine print in contracts and advertising one of things you vow to do in 2020.

Happy Chanukah and Merry Christmas from Mouse Print*.




• • •

August 12, 2019

Peek at the Fine Print in CBS’ Big Brother Contract With Houseguests

Filed under: Business,Humor — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:32 am

Big BrotherFor the past 21 years, CBS has aired the reality show Big Brother during the summer months. In the program, 16 contestants called “houseguests” are secluded from the outside world in a TV-set house for about 100 days with all their activities recorded 24/7. The last houseguest remaining after a series of evictions wins the game.

As you might imagine, with millions of dollars of advertising revenue on the line for CBS and high production costs, they have to ensure that all the contestants follow a strict set of rules and waive most of their rights. To that end, when those who apply to be on the program enter the finalist stage of casting, they are required to sign a 39-page, one-sided agreement designed to protect the network and the producers and to warn the would-be participant what they have in store.

Here are some of the more unusual provisions of the “applicant agreement“:

*MOUSE PRINT:

Contestants first have to agree to be recorded 24 hours a day, with or without clothing.



filmed naked


 
*MOUSE PRINT:

The producers control all the utilities in the Big Brother house, including water.



we control water


 
*MOUSE PRINT:

Contestants have to understand that they could be publicly humiliated and scorned.



humiliation is possible


 
*MOUSE PRINT:

And besides waiving their rights to sue CBS and the producers, and releasing the show from all liability of any kind, contestants have to keep their mouth shut about what happens in the program. This is how CBS ensures that compliance:



Millions in damages


And since “showmances” inevitably flourish during their three months in seclusion, all houseguests have to submit to testing for STDs.

So, why would anyone subject themselves to all this? Perhaps it is the lure of the $500,000 prize for the winner.




• • •

July 15, 2019

Klutzes Have Two Left Feet, So What Is Kmart Insinuating?

Filed under: Humor,Retail — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:26 am

Before we get to this week’s story…

UPDATE: A few weeks ago we told you that Citi was dropping most benefits from some of its credit cards including the very popular Citi Double Cash 2% cashback card. After searching for weeks, MrConsumer finally found an equivalent card, with 2% unlimited cash back AND virtually all the benefits like price protection, double the manufacturer’s warranty, CDW, lost luggage coverage, etc. It is the PayPal Cashback Mastercard. NOTE: Many consumer reviews of this card are negative concerning the bank’s customer service.


Let’s take a summer break this week from the nasty surprises that sometimes are buried in the fine print. Instead here’s the tale of MrConsumer’s recent purchase of sneakers from Kmart.com and its nasty surprise.

By accident a few months ago, MrConsumer found a pair of lightweight Everlast brand sneakers at Kmart that were the most comfortable ones he had ever worn. They soon became only available online and all the 9.5s were sold out. So I decided to bite the bullet and buy two pairs in size 10.

Kmart sneaker order

About 10 days after ordering, a bag arrived with four loose shoes inside:

3 left shoes

It may not be obvious from the picture, but they sent three left shoes and one right one. And they weren’t even all size 10. Duh?

The folks at my local Kmart had quite the chuckle when I dramatically pulled three left shoes out of the bag one-by-one. But they said my order didn’t beat the record they had previously seen of all the kids shoes in an order being only for the same foot.




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