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March 18, 2019

Thanks for Nothing, 2019 – Part 1

Filed under: Food/Groceries,Humor,Internet,Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:51 am

“Thanks for Nothing” spotlights advertising that seemingly promises a great deal, and then lets you down big-time, or makes a product claim that proves untrue, or just makes you scratch your head and laugh.

Example 1:

Buy Dig is an online seller of electronics and other goods. Recently they advertised a pretty high-value coupon online, $50 off.

$50 off

However, if you click-through to see the actual deal, you would no doubt be disappointed.

*MOUSE PRINT:

$2000 purchase required

To save that $50, you have to make a $2000 purchase, saving a mere 2.5% off. Thanks for nothing, Buy Dig.


Example 2:

The problem with this Aunt Jemima syrup doesn’t even require you to read the fine print ingredients statement.

Butter syrup

What? Contains no butter? Thanks for nothing, Auntie.


Example 3:

Nothing turns shoppers off like high shipping costs, but this example takes the cake.

high shipping costs

A cheap, small plastic bottle costs over $18 to ship and the tax is three times the item’s price? Thanks for nothing.


Example 4:

Finally, if you want a quick meal, ramen noodles are about as fast as you can get, and dirt cheap in this offer. The trouble is you could starve before your order arrives.

ramen noodles

Thanks for nothing, Amazon


If you find an offer suitable for a “Thanks for Nothing” mention, please submit it to edgar(at symbol)MousePrint.org .




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January 7, 2019

These Fireplace Logs Smell Like Fried Chicken But Come With a Warning

Filed under: Food/Groceries,Humor,Retail — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:43 am

What a brilliant idea. KFC found a company to create fireplace logs that smell like fried chicken, including the 11 secret herbs and spices.

KFC fireplace logs

But, as with most potentially hazardous products, these fireplace logs come with a set of fine print warnings.

*MOUSE PRINT:

disclaimer

Happy 2019 from Mouse Print*.




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October 22, 2018

Thanks for Nothing, Sears and Kmart

Filed under: Food/Groceries,Humor,Internet,Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:06 am

It is with a tinge of sadness that we lament the passing of hundreds more Sears and Kmart stores following their filing for bankruptcy last week. However, some of the dumb things that they have done can turn off consumers. For example, when retailers advertise a sale or reduced prices, shoppers expect to save money and be offered a good price. Sometimes, however, that wasn’t always the case at Sears and Kmart.

Example 1:

Just when Sears announced they were filing for bankruptcy last week, the local Sears in Cambridge, MA which had just started its own store closing sale, was adding an extra incentive — an extra 10% off your total purchase.

Sears 10% off

Great, except for one thing — the fine print on the coupon.

*MOUSE PRINT:

not at the register

What, you can’t use the coupon in the store and this is a store only coupon?

As it turns out, who knows what that really means because the Sears in Cambridge was automatically giving folks the extra 10% at the register, even without the coupon.


Example 2:

A couple of months ago, Sears MasterCard offered an unbelievable “month long” deal — get 20% back in points if you use the card at gas stations.

*MOUSE PRINT:

month long promotion

Apparently February has been displaced by August as the shortest month of the year.


Example 3:

People think that shopping online will generally save you money. These items at Kmart.com from marketplace sellers, however, challenge that assumption big time.

bread

.

matzo

.

Tide

Thanks for nothing, Sears and Kmart, for all these “deals.”


If you spot an outrageous or funny offer, please submit it to edgar (at symbol) mouseprint.org .




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October 15, 2018

Before Eating at KFC in the UK, You Must Sign a Disclaimer!

Filed under: Humor,Retail — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:34 am

Well, that is a bit of exaggeration, just the way KFC’s tongue-in-cheek advertising is promoting the re-introduction of its notoriously messy sandwich called the Dirty Louisiana burger.

It has three sauces that tend to ooze out when eating, so KFC in the UK is warning customers who order the “dirty” burger that they will be responsible for any splatter on their face or clothing.

*MOUSE PRINT:

KFC Dirty Disclaimer

The notice is designed to poke fun at all the privacy disclaimers that folks are receiving throughout Europe.

In addition to the “Dirty Disclaimer,” diners are also a given a bib that looks like Colonel Sanders’ white suit and black tie.




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August 27, 2018

Thanks for Nothing #6

Filed under: Humor,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:42 am

Here is the latest collection of advertisements that made us do a double-take when checking the fine print.

Example 1:

In many parts of the country, real estate prices have gone crazy. And that is certainly true in and around Boston… but this is ridiculous.

price increase

A jump from $300,000 to $1.5-million? The question is, which number is wrong?


Example 2:

Many Macy’s ads indicate that items are on “special” during certain hours and that after the special, the price will be higher. Apparently, that is not the case here.

Macy's after special price

During the limited time special, the price of these pillows was $20. After the “special,” they dropped to $12.99. The rebate was not limited to certain times of the day incidentally.


Example 3:

Here’s a nutty example from last December. Walmart had a small 5.5 ounce bag of Emerald mixed nuts on sale 47% off. Wow, you say… until you see the actual price.

Walmart's nutty price

What? This small bag of nuts had a regular price of $30.99, but they are “only” $16.36 on sale? Who would be nutty enough to pay such a high price? Now that eight months has passed, we have good news. The price has dropped to a mere $13.94 on their site! Thanks for nothing, Walmart.


Example 4:

In this disclosure from Sears, they try to explain that when they say that something is merely “on sale” that means only selected groups of items are actually on sale. But when they use the term “all” then it really does means all. Or does it?

Sears all on sale

Apparently when they use the term “all on sale” that really doesn’t mean “all” since over two dozen groups of items are not included. Thanks for nothing, Sears.

If you find a good example of a humorous surprise in the fine print, please submit it to Edgar(at symbol)MousePrint.org .




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