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August 27, 2018

Thanks for Nothing #6

Filed under: Humor,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:42 am

Here is the latest collection of advertisements that made us do a double-take when checking the fine print.

Example 1:

In many parts of the country, real estate prices have gone crazy. And that is certainly true in and around Boston… but this is ridiculous.

price increase

A jump from $300,000 to $1.5-million? The question is, which number is wrong?


Example 2:

Many Macy’s ads indicate that items are on “special” during certain hours and that after the special, the price will be higher. Apparently, that is not the case here.

Macy's after special price

During the limited time special, the price of these pillows was $20. After the “special,” they dropped to $12.99. The rebate was not limited to certain times of the day incidentally.


Example 3:

Here’s a nutty example from last December. Walmart had a small 5.5 ounce bag of Emerald mixed nuts on sale 47% off. Wow, you say… until you see the actual price.

Walmart's nutty price

What? This small bag of nuts had a regular price of $30.99, but they are “only” $16.36 on sale? Who would be nutty enough to pay such a high price? Now that eight months has passed, we have good news. The price has dropped to a mere $13.94 on their site! Thanks for nothing, Walmart.


Example 4:

In this disclosure from Sears, they try to explain that when they say that something is merely “on sale” that means only selected groups of items are actually on sale. But when they use the term “all” then it really does means all. Or does it?

Sears all on sale

Apparently when they use the term “all on sale” that really doesn’t mean “all” since over two dozen groups of items are not included. Thanks for nothing, Sears.

If you find a good example of a humorous surprise in the fine print, please submit it to Edgar(at symbol)MousePrint.org .




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October 16, 2017

Thanks for Nothing, Bass Pro Shops

Filed under: Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:34 am

Ron H., a regular Mouse Print* reader, recently told us about a pricing problem he experienced in Las Vegas at the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World store there.

His wife spied a bargain on a nice sweater as a gift for their son.

sweater

clearance sweater

*MOUSE PRINT:

The price tag indicated that the sweater was on clearance for $59.95, marked down from… $59.95! Wow, what a savings.

Back in their hotel room, Ron’s wife was curious to know how much they really saved on the sweater, so she peeled back the clearance tag to the see the real regular price.

*MOUSE PRINT:

peeled back price

To her shock, the regular price was $39.49 — over $20 LESS than the so called clearance price. The couple marched back to the store to speak to the manager. They were denied that request, but were given back the difference in price.

The customer service person said that this was a pricing mistake at the warehouse. Being the suspicious Mouse Print* reader that he is, Ron checked some other clearance items before leaving the store. Sure enough, he found other examples of inflated “clearance” price stickers put over lower regular prices.

For that, Bass Pro Shops, we say thanks for nothing.




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April 3, 2017

Thanks for Nothing #5

Filed under: Humor,Retail,Thanks for Nothing,Travel — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:48 am

In honor of April Fools’ Day a few days ago, we first offer you an ad to make you chuckle, and then two ads in our series of ones that don’t quite offer what they claim (but which throw in a chuckle at no extra cost).

Example 1:

Retailers are notorious for advertising that “everything” is on sale when there are many exclusions. Old Navy tried to play it straight(er) by advertising a big sale this way:

Old Navy "everything-ish"

Thanks for trying, Old Navy.


Example 2:

Southwest Airlines recently offered an airfare sale with “no gotchas.”

Souhtwest Airlines

Then what’s this?

*MOUSE PRINT:

Southwest terms and conditions

Thanks for nothing, Southwest. But thanks to Richard G. for the submission.


Example 3:

Our last “deal” is at Ace Hardware. Just use your loyalty card and pay $3 more than the regular price!

*MOUSE PRINT:

Ace Hardware

Thanks for nothing, Ace.


If you find an ad that screams “thanks for nothing,” please pass it on to Edgar(at symbol)MousePrint.org . Thanks.




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November 21, 2016

Thanks for Nothing: United Airlines Intros “Last Class” Service

Filed under: Thanks for Nothing,Travel — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 5:38 am

United AirlinesWe all know what first class air travel means — priority boarding, bigger seats, fancy food, quick exiting, etc. Now United Airlines is introducing what we have nicknamed “last class” service. As our moniker implies, this is at the opposite end of the spectrum of fares.

According to United’s website, “basic economy” as they call it will be their least expensive fare (with unspecified extra savings, if any), but will come with some new and severe limitations:

*MOUSE PRINT:

  • You will not be able to reserve a particular seat.
  • Seats will be assigned automatically at check-in, and presumably you will have no choices offered.

  • If you buy multiple seats for your family, sitting together is not guaranteed.

  • You can make no voluntary changes to your ticket.

  • You will earn miles, but not earn “segments.”

  • You will not be allowed to upgrade.

  • You will be automatically placed in the last group to board the plane.

    And the biggest (and nastiest) new restriction:

  • You cannot carry on any luggage except a small personal item like a laptop that fits under the seat in front of you.

  • So… during this Thanksgiving week, we say to United Airlines, thanks for nothing.




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    • • •

    October 10, 2016

    Thanks for Nothing #4

    Filed under: Food/Groceries,Internet,Retail,Thanks for Nothing — Edgar (aka MrConsumer) @ 6:10 am

    We continue our series of offers, which upon closer scrutiny, offer less than expected.

    Example 1:

    Supermarkets have become fond of advertising 10 for $10 deals. But this deal from a New York supermarket chain falls a little short.

    10 for $10

    *MOUSE PRINT:

    The bulbs are indeed 10 for $10, but you can only buy four it seems. Thanks for nothing, Shop Rite.


    Example 2:

    Speaking of buying larger quantities, we’ve always been taught that when you buy in bulk, you can often save money.

    Kidde

    *MOUSE PRINT:

    At Amazon, you can buy a two pack of detectors for the price of three single ones. That’s right, one is $15 and two are $47. Whatta deal. Thanks for nothing, Amazon.


    Example 3:

    Speaking of deals, Best Buy is seemingly offering an LG stainless steel dishwasher for an unheard of $199 in this ad:

    Best Buy

    *MOUSE PRINT:

    The dishwasher is not $199 as it first appears. That’s the price for the microwave. So, how much is the dishwasher? Who knows. Thanks for nothing, Best Buy.


    Example 4:

    A few weeks ago, we got Lowe’s to pull a TV commercial which promised 20% off major appliances, but according to the fine print, virtually every major brand was only a maximum of 10% off (except where noted). Now fast forward to this past Labor Day when Lowe’s upped the phantom discount to as high as 35% off.

    Lowe's

    *MOUSE PRINT:

    The fine print disclaimer in this commercial, just like the other ads, says:

    Whirlpool, Maytag, KitchenAid, Amana, GE, LG, Samsung, Frigidaire, Electrolux, and Bosch brands limited to a maximum 10% discount unless otherwise shown.

    So again, virtually all the major brands are not 35% off. In fact, a review of their website reveals that of the 200 dishwashers offered for sale, only one was 35% or more off the regular price. Thanks for nothing, Lowe’s.

    If you find a good example of a “Thanks for Nothing”-type offer, please pass on a screenshot of the ad to edgar (at symbol) mouseprint.org .




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